Step 4 Anatomy Lesson Plan

Your Objective:

Watch all of the following videos and read the description that follows them. Continue to educate yourself in regards to the muscles within the body, where they attach, and what function they perform. Fit-pro’s Academy strongly suggests you purchase Netter’s Anatomy Coloring Book, Anatomy Coloring Book for Health Professionals, The Human Body Coloring Book and The Anatomy Coloring Book.

Types of Muscle Contraction from Dave Parise CPT FPTA MES on Vimeo.

Types of Contractions

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Understanding the terminology First, (and to make matters a bit more complicated), the term contraction, when used along side the word muscle, as in muscle contraction, is generally understood by most as a shortening or reduction in the muscles’ length – and this is the dictionary definition. However in the athletic fitness world, this definition doesn’t take into account the dynamic nature of a muscle to work while being forced in the opposite direction, as in muscle lengthening, nor does it take into account a muscles dynamic ability to work while remaining in a fixed position. So while the words…

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The Physics of Muscle

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AT FitPros Academy the goal is not to teach you the names of all 799 skeletal muscles in the body, but rather to show you “how” the muscles are named. and How they react to specific resistance profiles.  Muscle names are not just a bunch of random Latin words, but rather, are named according to a set of informal rules; and once you understand those rules, you can pretty much tell where any muscle is located and what it does. I am not a fan of learning origins, and insertions…SO and now what? When you start the video lesson plans…

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The Deep Squat Debunked from Dave Parise CPT FPTA MES on Vimeo.

Lecture Stuart McGill talks about deep squat machanics

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I personally thank Stuart Mcgill for these videos. Stuart McGills research in the Spine Biomechanics Laboratory has three objectives: to understand how the low back functions; to understand how it becomes injured; and, knowing this, formulate and investigate hypotheses related to prevention of injury and optimal rehabilitation of the injured back, and ultimate performance of the athletic back. We have two separate laboratory approaches – one which examines intact humans which utilizes a rather unique approach that monitors spine motion and body segment position, muscle activation, ligament involvement and modelling tissue loading in each individual subject; and a second approach…

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About Dr. Stuart McGill

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25 Years ago we stumbled upon many educators in our industry. One in particular stood above the rest. His name is Dr. Stuart McGill. Here are some great reads Here are some great videos Stuart McGill, PhD, MSc, BPHE When reviewing / reading these publications do not get overwhelmed. Take a little in at a time…digest it, and understand its message. All to often we add exercises that harm without realizing the accumulative results. Dr McGill (A friend of mine) is a Professor of spine bio-mechanics at the University of Waterloo. He is the author of 3 textbooks and over…

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Cervical vertebrae Atlas & Axis from Dave Parise CPT FPTA MES on Vimeo.

Cervical vertebrae Atlas & Axis

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At the cervical region the spinal column is further classified into an upper and lower cervical region. The atlas is one of the two upper cervical vertebrae, also known as C1, which is the topmost vertebra of the spinal column. It is the vertebra that is in contact with the occipital bone, a flat bone located at the back portion of the head. This first cervical bone is named from the mythical Greek god who carried the world on his shoulders, as its function is to support the globe of the head. Together with the second vertebra, the axis, it…

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Scapula

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The scapula, or shoulder blade, is a flat, triangular bone located to the posterior of the shoulder. The scapula articulates with the clavicle through the acromion process, a large projection located superiorly on the scapula forming the acromioclavicular joint. The scapula also articulates with the humerus of the upper arm to form the shoulder joint, or glenohumeral joint, at the glenoid cavity. Due to its flat nature, the scapula presents two surfaces and three borders; the front-facing costal surface and the rear-facing dorsal surface, as well as the superior, lateral, and medial borders. The serratus anterior originates from the costal surface,…

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Shoulder Impingement Syndrome from Dave Parise CPT FPTA MES on Vimeo.

SIS = Shoulder impingement syndrome

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Shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) results from pressure on the rotator cuff from part of the shoulder blade (scapula) as the arm is lifted. This pressure is a common cause of pain in the adult shoulder. Read Certified VS Qualified to understand the meaning of SIS as it relates to improper exercise selections. ANATOMY The major joint in the shoulder, called the gleno-humeral joint, is between the cup of the scapula (glenoid) and the ball of the arm (humeral head). This cup and ball are surrounded by the rotator cuff. The rotator cuff is made up of four muscles (the supraspinatus,…

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